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Medical Weight Loss in Johns Island, SC

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A New Solution to a Serious Problem

Obesity is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the United States. Recent statistics show that more than 78 million people are affected by obesity, whether that's through diabetes, heart disease, cardiovascular issues, or even death. Millions try to lose weight every year to combat the negative effects that obesity brings about, but a large number of those people are unsuccessful. It can be easy for those without weight problems to say, "just lose the weight!" but unfortunately, weight loss isn't something that happens overnight. When done properly, it involves careful planning and professional help. When done incorrectly, it involves yo-yo dieting, fad diet solutions, and other unsafe methods.

Fad diets seen on TV can be encouraging, but the truth is most of these "programs" are less about healthy weight loss and more about losing weight fast. These unhealthy, unbalanced diets often foster weight gain, not weight loss over time.

Fortunately, more and more overweight adults and even children are turning to professionals for help, who not only help them achieve their weight loss goals but keep them on track and healthy for the long term. If you're looking for the highest quality medical weight loss in Johns Island, SC, look no further than Back 2 Health Physical Medicine.

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Medical Weight Loss Johns Island, SC
What Our Clients Say

What Our Clients Say

Losing Weight and Getting Back 2 Health the Right Way

If you were to ask one of our experienced clinicians their tips for a healthy life, maintaining a healthy weight would be at the very top of the list. This is especially true given the prevalence of certain viruses like COVID-19, which can wreak havoc on the body of an unhealthy, overweight individual. Unfortunately, given the sheer number of diet plans and "miracle" weight loss supplements, dieting can be a confusing, counterproductive journey. To make matters worse, many of these weight loss programs are not medically tested or supervised, which is dangerous.

At Back 2 Health, our team is committed to helping our clients lose weight and maintain that weight loss, so they can live a healthy, fulfilling life. Unlike some weight loss companies that tout "quick weight loss solutions," Back 2 Health Physical Medicine focuses on real results through time-tested techniques, strong support, and sustainable habits. There are no starvation diets or extreme exercise plans at our weight loss clinic in Johns Island - only medically-backed programs customized to your lifestyle.

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Our medical weight loss programs include:

  • Nutritional Counseling
  • Medical Counseling
  • Health Metrics
  • Access to Our Knowledgeable Weight Loss Team
  • Medication Management
  • Customized Weight Loss Program
  • Blood Work
  • Available Health Supplements Such as B-12 Injections

Why Choose Back 2 Health for Medical Weight Loss in Johns Island, SC?

If you have tried to lose weight in the past but have failed, don't sweat it - there are millions of other men and women in your shoes as well. Your weight loss challenges are less about you failing and more about the diets or regimens you used. When it comes to healthy weight loss, there are no one-size-fits-all solutions. That's why, when you walk into our medical weight loss clinic, we will conduct a thorough assessment and develop a custom weight loss strategy that you feel good about.

Our clients choose Back 2 Health Physical Medicine because we truly care about our customers' health. Our goal is to be as flexible and open about your weight loss journey as possible. Our customized plans fit not only your health needs but also your fitness goals and budget requirements.

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Our comprehensive medical weight loss plans include:

  • Regular follow-ups to ensure that you are staying healthy as you slim down
  • Cutting-edge treatments that reduce food cravings and speed up your metabolism
  • Ongoing support from our highly trained weight loss team
  • Personalized diet and exercise plans created with your lifestyle and medical history in mind
  • Education about exercise and how you can start a regular exercise routine
  • Prescription medications when needed
  • Enthusiastic tips and recommendations if you hit a weight loss plateau or don't achieve your goals
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Choosing a medically supervised weight loss treatment plan from Back 2 Health Physical Medicine ensures that you lose weight safely and effectively, even after you achieve your weight loss goals. As you shed excess weight, we can also provide training and recommendations that keep the pounds off for good. If you're ready to give up on crash dieting and unsafe fads, it's time to call Back 2 Health in Johns Island, SC. Your body, your friends, and your family will thank you!

A Safe Solution to Long-TermWeight Loss

If you were to ask someone on the street to name a popular fad diet, they probably wouldn't have much trouble. From Atkins to South Beach and Keto to Paleo, we've all heard of at least one popular weight-loss trend. The problem with these diets is that they only work for some people. Even then, the results are often short-lived.

If you're wondering whether you have been on or are currently using a fad diet, ask yourself these questions:

  • Is there a "magic" food source that will melt the pounds off your body?
  • Is the speed of weight loss unnatural or unrealistic?
  • Can you achieve "weight loss" without proper diet and exercise?
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If you answered "yes" to any of the above questions, chances are it's a fad diet, and it most likely won't be very effective over the long run. With fad diets, balanced nutrition often takes the back seat to sketchy weight loss pills or extreme life choices - all of which are counterproductive to a healthy life.

If you have struggled with your weight for any length of time, there's no doubt you're stressed out trying to find an effective solution. You probably have many stories about following fad diets, taking unhealthy diet pills, or even dropping big bucks on expensive exercise equipment. If you're like most of our clients, you're still struggling with your weight, despite your best efforts. The common theme here is that all of your self-made attempts happened without the medical guidance of a true medical weight loss clinic in Johns Island, SC.

If this sounds like you, we've got great news. The safest, most effective solution to losing weight starts with the help of Back 2 Health's medical weight loss plans. Instead of choosing a fad diet, speak to one of our weight loss healthcare professionals. We can help you lose weight in a way that you find enjoyable, so you actually like

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Factors That Contribute to Obesity

Obesity is a nuanced disease that involves excessive amounts of body fat. It's not just a cosmetic concern. It's a medical issue that raises a person's chance of severe diseases and health problems. Often, obese people have problems losing weight because of physiological, genetic, and environmental factors. There are many other contributing factors to weight gain, including:

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Inactivity

People who live sedentary lifestyles will take in more calories than they burn off through exercise or day-to-day activities. Inactivity is a huge problem in today's society, especially with the constant presence of computers, smartphones, and tablets that encourage the user to stay glued to their screen.

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Unhealthy Diet

If your daily food intake consists of high-caloric fast-food meals full of oversized portions, expect to gain weight quickly.

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Liquid Calories

Alcoholic and other high-calorie drinks like sodas cause people to intake large amounts of calories without ever feeling full. When combined with a poor diet and lack of water intake, consuming liquid calories can be a significant contributor to weight gain.

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Pregnancy

Weight gain is very common during pregnancy, but some women find it hard to lose the added pounds once they have given birth. With time, this weight gain will contribute to obesity.

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Lack of Sleep

When you don't get enough sleep, your whole body suffers. If you're only getting a few hours of sleep a night, you may notice increased appetite and even hormone changes. Both factors can contribute to obesity.

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Smoking Cessation

Quitting smoking is one of the healthiest choices you can make as an adult. However, sometimes smoking cessation causes weight gain. For some, this weight gain gets out of control and leads to obesity. Often times this happens as former smokers use food to cope with their withdrawals.

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Stress

When you're stressed out, you may turn to a chocolate bar or cheeseburger as "comfort food" to deal with whatever problem you're facing. Turning to fast food and sweets is not a healthy way to deal with stress and can lead to obesity.

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS SPECIAL LIMITED TIME OFFER WHICH INCLUDES:

  • Medical Consultation
  • Nutritional Conselling
  • Medical weight loss program
  • Weekly lipo B-12 injections
  • Blood work

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$99

Consequences of Obesity

Although being obese is considered a physical condition, obesity's effects stretch far beyond a person's body composition and weight. Being overweight is associated with several long-term health problems. Many of these problems rank among the nation's leading reasons for premature death. Generally, the more excess weight you carry around, the more likely you are to develop negative complications with your health.

Individuals who are clinically obese have a heightened risk of the following ailments:

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  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol)
  • Cardiovascular Issues (stroke, heart attack, and more)
  • Acid Reflux and Heartburn
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Joint Pain, Back Pain, and Orthopedic Issues
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Blood Clots
  • Fatty Liver Disease
  • Skin Infections
  • Incontinence from Stress
  • Breathing Problems
  • Cancer (colon, uterus, esophagus, cervix, pancreas, prostate, and more)
  • Severe Symptoms Resulting from COVID-19

The good news? Substantial weight loss is possible with diet, physical activity, and the help of a medical weight loss team. You do not have to be destined to live with obesity and a shorter life expectancy. Back 2 Health Physical Medicine is here to steer you down the path to a positive, healthy life for years to come.

Benefits of Using a Medical Weight Loss Clinic in Johns Island, SC

Controlling your weight is a healthy habit that allows you to maintain proper health. However, losing weight isn't just about looking better. It's about feeling better too and is a very important part of being healthy and well. Before you throw caution out the window and try a "miraculous" weight loss solution, contact Back 2 Health Physical Medicine. Our medical weight loss clinicians don't just focus on making you slimmer. Instead, we oversee improvements relating to hormonal imbalances, high blood pressure, cholesterol, digestive problems, and diet. We are devoted to changing the lives of our clients, one weight loss plan at a time.

Here are just a few benefits of using a medical weight loss clinic:

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Inactivity
Inactivity

People who live sedentary lifestyles will take in more calories than they burn off through exercise or day-to-day activities. Inactivity is a huge problem in today's society, especially with the constant presence of computers, smartphones, and tablets that encourage the user to stay glued to their screen.

Unhealthy Diet
Unhealthy Diet

If your daily food intake consists of high-caloric fast-food meals full of oversized portions, expect to gain weight quickly.

Liquid Calories
Liquid Calories

Alcoholic and other high-calorie drinks like sodas cause people to intake large amounts of calories without ever feeling full. When combined with a poor diet and lack of water intake, consuming liquid calories can be a significant contributor to weight gain.

It's Time to Make a Change

When you sign up with Back 2 Health, know that you are taking a hugely important step to living a healthier life. If you're ready to feel better, look better, and live longer, call our medical weight loss clinic in Johns Island today. Before you know it, you will look and feel better than you ever have before.

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Latest News in Johns Island, SC

Frosé, boozy milkshakes on the menu at new Johns Island ice cream shop

JOHNS ISLAND — Jill and Keith Cummings own two ice cream parlors, two bait and tackle shops, and a charter fishing business in North Carolina.When they started building a house on Johns Island, they realized the area could use a new ice cream shop. Nearly four years later, the couple opened one called Weezy’s Ice Cream & Cocktails.As its name plainly states, patrons can expect to find more than just 36 flavors of h...

JOHNS ISLAND — Jill and Keith Cummings own two ice cream parlors, two bait and tackle shops, and a charter fishing business in North Carolina.

When they started building a house on Johns Island, they realized the area could use a new ice cream shop. Nearly four years later, the couple opened one called Weezy’s Ice Cream & Cocktails.

As its name plainly states, patrons can expect to find more than just 36 flavors of hard-scoop ice cream at the 3293 Maybank Highway location. In addition to ice cream, Weezy’s — named after Jill’s mom — is equipped with a full bar that specializes in classic cocktails, frozen drinks and boozy milkshakes like the banana pudding: Banana pudding ice cream, whipped cream vodka and vanilla wafers. For food, Weezy’s serves meat and cheese, flatbreads, paninis and snacks.

“We just decided that we needed an ice cream store down here,” Jill Cummings said. “And then it just kind of progressed to what it is now.”

Since opening their North Carolina Weezy’s Ice Cream stores in 2015 and 2018, staffing up every spring and summer has been a challenge, she said. With the goal of establishing a year-round destination, they decided to expand the menu at Weezy’s on Johns Island.

“Ice cream is a very seasonal business, so we decided that we needed to do something a little different to keep staffing,” she said. “So then of course the food came into play because you can’t have liquor without food.”

Weezy’s debut has been a long time coming.

The couple was finalizing plans to open Weezy’s on Johns Island’s River Road in 2019 when they received a call from their contractor. The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control had found a problem with the space, and they would have to start from scratch elsewhere, the contractor told them.

The couple put what they could in storage while searching for a new location, eventually landing on Weezy’s current home in a new development near Tattooed Moose and Estuary Beans & Barley. After signing the lease in summer 2021, they started outfitting the space with extra furniture they purchased from a boutique hotel in downtown Charleston.

Weezy’s hosted a soft opening April 29, nearly three years after it was supposed to open on River Road.

Bar manager Danielle Wheeler and store manager David Vick are working alongside the Cummings with the goal of making the new shop a local staple. Wheeler — hired to work at the initial Weezy’s location in 2019 — is in charge of creating the boozy shakes, frosé and craft cocktails like the chamomile-infused gin “Weez Knees” or “Broseph’s Old Fashioned.”

Vick, an experienced food and beverage industry veteran who spent years at Hominy Grill, will lead day-to-day operations.

“You never really see anyone that’s unhappy eating ice cream,” said Vick, who managed the two North Carolina Weezy’s stores for parts of the past three years since Hominy Grill closed. “That’s just what kind of drew me to it and the busyness of it.”

Jill Cummings said Weezy’s is built to be a family-friendly establishment that caters to Johns Island locals. So far, “the people that have come in have been very positive,” she said.

Weezy’s is open noon-9 p.m. Wednesday through Monday (closed Tuesday) with plans to expand weekend hours in the future. For more information, follow Weezy’s on social media.

New 35-acre preserve coming soon to the Angel Oak

You may already know all about the Angel Oak and how its history spans half a millennium. As Charlestonians, we’re a part of this local landmark’s past, present, and future.We’ll go out on a limb + say you may not know about Angel Oak Preserve — a project featuring a public green space su...

You may already know all about the Angel Oak and how its history spans half a millennium. As Charlestonians, we’re a part of this local landmark’s past, present, and future.

We’ll go out on a limb + say you may not know about Angel Oak Preserve — a project featuring a public green space surrounding Angel Oak Park on Johns Island that’s currently in the planning + public feedback stage.

The project is intended to: Provide a publicly-accessible landscape Conserve the Angel Oak’s integrity Protect the surrounding ecosystem Spread out foot traffic at the park Honor the rural + cultural context of the land

Almost a decade of community outreach has gone into plans for the preserve. The Lowcountry Land Trust, local partners, and the Save the Angel Oak initiative acquired 35 acres surrounding the live oak which will make up the green space.

Lowcountry Land Trust chose Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects to design a comprehensive plan with the help of Robinson Engineering. The planning process, which launches this summer, will include public meetings and surveys. We could see a complete design by early next year, knock on wood.

Public meetings kick off June 9 at 7 p.m. + June 15 at 6:30 p.m. at John’s Island Regional Library. Come prepared to share what you want to see at the preserve and be ready to learn more about Lowcountry Land Trust, the Angel Oak, and how you can help.

Before you make like a tree and leave, sign up for the Angel Oak Preserve newsletter and take the survey.

Four local women sizzle in male-dominated brewing

The sun comes up over the Atlantic making its way over the Charleston landscape and it’s not long before the temperature climbs. While most consider late August into September the “dog days of summer,” in the brewing community — especially, the breweries that don’t have a full air-conditioning system — the dog days seem to start earlier and earlier.For four area women, each in different areas of the brewing business, the days might look different, but they are all long and hot nonetheless. We sat do...

The sun comes up over the Atlantic making its way over the Charleston landscape and it’s not long before the temperature climbs. While most consider late August into September the “dog days of summer,” in the brewing community — especially, the breweries that don’t have a full air-conditioning system — the dog days seem to start earlier and earlier.

For four area women, each in different areas of the brewing business, the days might look different, but they are all long and hot nonetheless. We sat down with these women to discuss their lives and experiences in this male-dominated industry over a beer and brunch at Holy City Brewing.

Packaging lead at Commonhouse Aleworks

“8 a.m. is hello and safety, 8:30 is grain in.” It’s noisy, wet, and slightly chaotic. There are bags of grain lined up at the mill and hot water is already running in the mash tun. This is the start of the day at Commonhouse Aleworks for Daisy Crater. She is hosting the Pink Boots Society to brew an IPL (India Pale Lager) for its charity.

A South Carolina native, Daisy grew up in Gaffney and found beer at a young age. While studying accounting at Clemson University in the late 1990s, she was also waiting tables at Keith Street Bar and Grill. This was where she discovered a vast selection of beer.

“They had the best selection of bottled beer. If you could drink one of every beer, you got your name on the wall. And boy, I tried to fill that card.”

After she got her degree, she started working in the banking industry. “I love numbers. I love the math of accounting. But if you aren’t fulfilled with your work, you aren’t fulfilled.”

Several years later, she was watching a news report about the Cicerone program. This struck a chord in her, and she started home brewing as a hobby. Soon that hobby became a passion and that passion became a career.

“I walked away from banking, and never looked back.”

First, she started busing tables at Newgrass Brewing. It was there she met co-founder Jordan Boinest. Boinest founded the Asheville and Charlotte chapters of the Pink Boots Society (PBS), and was instrumental in helping Daisy expand her craft beer knowledge. PBS offers Cicerone classes, internships and scholarships to women in the craft beer industry.

It wasn’t long before Daisy moved into front of the house management at Newgrass. But her heart had a desire to work on the production side of a brewery. “I wanted to be in a brewhouse. I wanted to build the recipes, to smell the beer brewing.”

In 2019, Daisy took a leap of faith and moved to Charleston. Her first stop was South Carolina’s oldest brewery, Palmetto Brewing. From there, she began developing relationships around town. Her resume now boasts stints with Rusty Bull and Pawleys Island.

Now after years of experience, Daisy not only works in production, but she runs the Wild Goose canning line and does cellar work at Commonhouse Aleworks. If you see her, ask her about her love of low D.O. (dissolved oxygen). “One of my favorite things is stepping out the door next to the keg washer. There are these Carolina Wrens, the fellows with the white eyeliner. They play among the pallets, in the sunshine, with the smells of the brewery. It makes my heart happy.”

We think it’s safe to say that Daisy has a long, promising career in brewing.

The Pink Boots Society is available in the Commonhouse Aleworks taproom. More: pinkbootssociety.org

Kim Berly says she’s learned that sometimes you have to put a smile on your face and walk away.

“It’s hard to understand how someone who was enjoying the hell out of a beer, [and then] questions the same beer when they find out a woman brewed it.”

Lead brewer at Frothy Beard Brewing in West Ashley, Kim hails from Brookfield, Conn., and began her career in the beauty business. First, she studied at Oxford Academy of Hair Design. Then she worked as a stylist for many years before becoming an instructor back at Oxford Academy.

When asked about how she chose Charleston, she replied. “I just kind of ended up here.” As a bartender at Frothy Beard, every employee gets a brew day. “They (Frothy) feel it is important for everyone to know what everyone else does in the brewery. And I loved my brew day. I wanted to know how everything worked. What this did, how to do that. How do I get to work back here?”

First, she began by volunteering to help on canning days. In her downtime, she began reading. “So many books,” Kim said. “Books by John Palmer, anything I could find about beer, online classes, but mainly I learned by doing.” This led to her being offered a full-time job in production. After a few years, she became the head brewer.

“I’m short, and I don’t weigh more than the kegs I move, but you figure it out. Platforms and determination help. And hand carts are your best friend.”

“I’ve been asked, ‘where’s your beard?’ and told ‘you make pretty good beer for a girl.’ That’s when the smile comes in. Everyone here has my back. This industry is a big family. I want it to see the whole craft beer community grow.”

Co-founder, owner/operator at Tradesman Brewing

“I always said, when it stopped being fun or I knew it all, it was time to get out.”

Sara Gayle McConnel is the vice president of operations at Tradesman Brewing but she was referring to her career as a nurse in the neonatal intensive care unit of MUSC. “I was a nurse, a patient advocate, a nurse educator. And after 25 years, I knew it was time to move on.”

Scott McConnell, her husband, was a longtime home brewer. He and Sara Gayle decided to open a brewery to pursue their craft brew dreams. And in 2014, Tradesman Brewery opened on James Island and their dreams became reality. It was one Charleston’s eight breweries at that time. Four subsequent breweries also opened in 2014: Freehouse Brewery, Edmund’s Oast Brewpub, and Frothy Beard Brewing. It was clear that this community was growing fast.

“My official title is VP of operations.” Sara Gayle said. “This is a fancy way of saying I do everything inside while Scott runs the production outside. But sometimes our jobs overlap.”

While juggling the many aspects of the business, she also founded the Brewster Program, a series of female-led brew day events for women to learn about the brewing process and to help create beer. It’s designed to get more women interested and involved in the brewing process.

“Every day I hear women asking more questions about beer,” she said. “Questions like, what hops are in this, what is this style, how was it made? Every day, there are more opportunities for women to join the industry, whether it’s front of house, production, or in the business of beer. This industry is a family, a community. The bigger the family, the better the community. I want to use our spot (Tradesman) to give back to the community, and watch it grow.”

“I love seeing our regulars,” Keli told HOPS.. They know everyone’s birthdays and will bake them treats for it. And Mandi, our neighborhood dog in a backpack.” Keli has spent the past four years holding down the front of the house fort at Revelry Brewing.

Keli made her way to Charleston from Orangeburg after most of her family moved here in 2009. She’s worked in the food and beverage industry for most of her life but has larger ambitions to pursue a career in the booming Charleston film industry. Lagunitas Brewing on Bay Street (originally Southend Brewery) brought Keli into the craft beer world.

“I got excited to see new beers, to find out what was coming out next.” The innovation and consistent new releases kept Keli coming back to try more and more.

Keli described how each shift is a chance to catch up with customers. “I love working at the brewery, it allows me to step away from the craziness. The regulars contribute in their own way to keeping me sane.” Relationships are built over time. Each familiar face is a way to connect. Each new face is a chance to connect. I love being busy, but not slammed. That way I can catch up with the person, not just the open tab.”

Connections are key in the industry and Keli sees the big picture of how this will help her future.

While working at Revelry, Keli is also pursuing a degree in film media at Trident Technical College. “It started with a class in filming, which led to a class in editing, which led to a class in production. I want to do everything and keep adding to my knowledge.”

Through those connections and education, Keli is excited for future promotional work and commercials. She even wants to tackle documentaries. Maybe even one about Charleston’s craft beer scene.

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Johns Island neighbors are organizing against potential hurricane debris burn site

JOHNS ISLAND — As Charleston County decides whether to buy 95 acres on this sea island to manage hurricane wreckage, nearby residents are speaking out against the move.Several people showed up to the Feb. 1 County Council meeting, urging the panel not to allow burning and dirt mining on the parcels. They cited concerns about air quality from smoke and trucks running up and down Johns Island’s already clogged roads. Some have organized a planned meeting for concerned neighbors on Feb. 5, when they will convene to discuss th...

JOHNS ISLAND — As Charleston County decides whether to buy 95 acres on this sea island to manage hurricane wreckage, nearby residents are speaking out against the move.

Several people showed up to the Feb. 1 County Council meeting, urging the panel not to allow burning and dirt mining on the parcels. They cited concerns about air quality from smoke and trucks running up and down Johns Island’s already clogged roads. Some have organized a planned meeting for concerned neighbors on Feb. 5, when they will convene to discuss the matter further.

“It just feels like another punch in the gut as a Johns Island resident, to be honest with you,” Becca Nexsen, who lives near the site, told The Post and Courier. “We have unbridled development, there’s so little infrastructure … we’re Charleston County’s dumping ground. Of course we’re going to get this.”

The proposal to buy three tracts of farmland between Humbert Road and Main Road, known locally as Grayson Oaks, first came before County Council in a committee meeting in late January. Eric Adams, the county’s deputy director for public works, told The Post and Courier the site could be used to burn fallen tree limbs and vegetation after a major storm, to turn this material into wood chips, or as a possible dirt mine.

One of the reasons the land is attractive to the county is because of an infestation of invasive Asian longhorned beetles. A large swath of southern Charleston County is inside a beetle quarantine area, and wood cannot legally be removed without being processed or shredded into small pieces first. The Grayson Oaks land is inside that boundary, and thus, could handle debris inside of it too.

But Ted Cadmus, who lives in the Gift Plantation neighborhood less than a mile away, said the smoke would be a nuisance to local property values, and that additional trucks to and from the site would stress already-packed roads.

“I kind of don’t care if it is infrequent or frequent as far as the burning is concerned,” Cadmus said. Even if the county uses special burning methods to lessen smoke, he said, “the same pollutants are going to be thrown off.”

Cadmus also worried about ash from the fire polluting groundwater, and thus, wells in the area around it. One of the speakers at the County Council meeting also said he and others off Humbert Road use well water and could be affected.

Patricia Fair, a researcher who has spent decades studying environmental contamination, spoke at the council meeting and wrote them a letter describing the potential health effects of wood smoke. Fair, who also lives in Gift Plantation and works as adjunct faculty for the Medical University of South Carolina, wrote that the fine particulate matter in smoke, or soot, can cause a bevy of health effects.

“These microscopic particles can get into your eyes and respiratory system, where they may cause burning eyes, runny nose, and illnesses, such as bronchitis,” Fair wrote. “Fine particles can make asthma symptoms worse and trigger asthma attacks. Fine particles can also trigger heart attacks, stroke, irregular heart rhythms, and heart failure, especially in people who are already at risk for these conditions.”

Council members appeared split on the issue at their Feb. 1 meeting, with some expressing concern over potential nuisances from the site, and others saying that this kind of hurricane cleanup work was simply not optional and needed a reliable location.

“If there’s a valid need and there’s property, we’ve got to try and figure out a way to make it work,” Councilman Brantley Moody said. “We’ve got to find places to do this (type of work) that are other than just stick it in North Charleston.”

But Councilwoman Anna Johnson, who represents Johns Island, said the additional traffic strain on Main Road wouldn’t work, and the St. Johns Fire District is already stretched thin by residents’ reports of smoke from rural burning elsewhere on the island.

She questioned whether the county is considering the land “because it’s available to be purchased, or because we need some place to burn, or we need a (dirt) pit?”

Ultimately, County Council tabled the issue for a month.

But residents will continue to organize in the meantime. A meeting has been set for 9 a.m. on Feb. 5, in the parking lot of Berkeley Electric Cooperative at 1135 Main Road.

Trident hospital owner eyes Johns Island for new facility with nearly $20M land deal

The owner of Trident Medical Center has set its sights on rapidly developing Johns Island for a new health care facility.An affiliate of Nashville-based HCA Healthcare recently paid nearly $20 million for 55 acres through multiple transactions on several parcels along Zelasko Drive between Maybank Highway and Cane Slash Road, according to Charleston County land records.The property will become part of Trident Health, which is owned by HCA, according to a spokesman.Christina Oh, president and CEO of the local system, whic...

The owner of Trident Medical Center has set its sights on rapidly developing Johns Island for a new health care facility.

An affiliate of Nashville-based HCA Healthcare recently paid nearly $20 million for 55 acres through multiple transactions on several parcels along Zelasko Drive between Maybank Highway and Cane Slash Road, according to Charleston County land records.

The property will become part of Trident Health, which is owned by HCA, according to a spokesman.

Christina Oh, president and CEO of the local system, which includes Trident Medical Center and other facilities in the Charleston area, said the region’s population is growing and Trident is looking to expand its services to island residents.

“As our community continues to rapidly grow, we look to respond by bringing needed health-care services to areas that are underserved,” Oh said. “James and Johns Island residents routinely have to drive 30 or more minutes to reach the care they need.”

She said Trident Health “can help fill that gap.”

Oh provided no timetable or cost for construction of a new facility on Johns Island.

“We look forward to working closely with community leaders and neighbors to get their ideas on what they need in their backyard,” Oh said.

In addition to the 321-bed Trident Medical Center in North Charleston, Trident Health also includes the 124-bed Summerville Medical Center and three freestanding emergency rooms at Brighton Park in Nexton, Centre Pointe near Tanger Outlets and Moncks Corner Medical Center.

The 135-bed Colleton Medical Center in Walterboro also is owned by HCA, a for-profit company that’s listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

HCA affiliate Johns Island MC LLC paid $17.2 million for almost 48 acres on 10 parcels last fall, according to the commercial real estate firm NAI Charleston, which represented the seller.

The sellers of most of the land were affiliates of the real estate development firm EYC Companies of Charleston, according to land records.

HCA also bought five smaller neighboring parcels in separate transactions from four individual landowners for a combined $2.28 million, according to recently recorded deeds.

The assemblage of several parcels, across from live Oak Square Shopping Center, extends along most of Zelasko Drive.

Johns Island has undergone rapid growth in recent years, especially with the booming housing market and influx of new residents to the Charleston region.

Several new housing developments as well as new retail and restaurant sites have sprung up in recent years on the island that’s partially in the city of Charleston.

About 23,000 people live on the island, according to the 2020 census. Roughly 12,000 of those reside inside Charleston city limits, according to city spokesman Jack O’Toole.

Part of the health care provider’s purchased acreage is zoned for uses such as a business park and general office development. The rest of it is not currently zoned, according to Charleston’s zoning map.

On the eastern side of Johns Island near the upscale communities of Kiawah and Seabrook islands along the coast, the Medical University of South Carolina is building a new facility.

MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion will be at 1884 Seabrook Island Road down the street from the Harris Teeter-anchored Freshfields Village Shopping Center.

The healthcare provider’s website says double-digit population growth is anticipated on the sea islands over the next five years with a growing percentage of residents in the area over the age of 65.

“This growth, along with the islands’ geographic isolation, demographics and community health profiles, has created an urgent need for additional health care services in this part of the South Carolina Lowcountry,” MUSC says on its website.

MUSC says the new medical facility will provide “access to life-saving medical care in a new free-standing Emergency Room, with trauma rooms, fast-track triage, full CT scan and radiology services, full lab services and helipad.” The site also will offer primary care and outpatient services.

The $24 million project is expected to complete construction by 2023, according to MUSC when it announced the development last summer.

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