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Medical Weight Loss in West Ashley, SC

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A New Solution to a Serious Problem

Obesity is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the United States. Recent statistics show that more than 78 million people are affected by obesity, whether that's through diabetes, heart disease, cardiovascular issues, or even death. Millions try to lose weight every year to combat the negative effects that obesity brings about, but a large number of those people are unsuccessful. It can be easy for those without weight problems to say, "just lose the weight!" but unfortunately, weight loss isn't something that happens overnight. When done properly, it involves careful planning and professional help. When done incorrectly, it involves yo-yo dieting, fad diet solutions, and other unsafe methods.

Fad diets seen on TV can be encouraging, but the truth is most of these "programs" are less about healthy weight loss and more about losing weight fast. These unhealthy, unbalanced diets often foster weight gain, not weight loss over time.

Fortunately, more and more overweight adults and even children are turning to professionals for help, who not only help them achieve their weight loss goals but keep them on track and healthy for the long term. If you're looking for the highest quality medical weight loss in West Ashley, SC, look no further than Back 2 Health Physical Medicine.

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Medical Weight Loss West Ashley, SC
What Our Clients Say

What Our Clients Say

Losing Weight and Getting Back 2 Health the Right Way

If you were to ask one of our experienced clinicians their tips for a healthy life, maintaining a healthy weight would be at the very top of the list. This is especially true given the prevalence of certain viruses like COVID-19, which can wreak havoc on the body of an unhealthy, overweight individual. Unfortunately, given the sheer number of diet plans and "miracle" weight loss supplements, dieting can be a confusing, counterproductive journey. To make matters worse, many of these weight loss programs are not medically tested or supervised, which is dangerous.

At Back 2 Health, our team is committed to helping our clients lose weight and maintain that weight loss, so they can live a healthy, fulfilling life. Unlike some weight loss companies that tout "quick weight loss solutions," Back 2 Health Physical Medicine focuses on real results through time-tested techniques, strong support, and sustainable habits. There are no starvation diets or extreme exercise plans at our weight loss clinic in West Ashley - only medically-backed programs customized to your lifestyle.

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Our medical weight loss programs include:

  • Nutritional Counseling
  • Medical Counseling
  • Health Metrics
  • Access to Our Knowledgeable Weight Loss Team
  • Medication Management
  • Customized Weight Loss Program
  • Blood Work
  • Available Health Supplements Such as B-12 Injections

Why Choose Back 2 Health for Medical Weight Loss in West Ashley, SC?

If you have tried to lose weight in the past but have failed, don't sweat it - there are millions of other men and women in your shoes as well. Your weight loss challenges are less about you failing and more about the diets or regimens you used. When it comes to healthy weight loss, there are no one-size-fits-all solutions. That's why, when you walk into our medical weight loss clinic, we will conduct a thorough assessment and develop a custom weight loss strategy that you feel good about.

Our clients choose Back 2 Health Physical Medicine because we truly care about our customers' health. Our goal is to be as flexible and open about your weight loss journey as possible. Our customized plans fit not only your health needs but also your fitness goals and budget requirements.

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Our comprehensive medical weight loss plans include:

  • Regular follow-ups to ensure that you are staying healthy as you slim down
  • Cutting-edge treatments that reduce food cravings and speed up your metabolism
  • Ongoing support from our highly trained weight loss team
  • Personalized diet and exercise plans created with your lifestyle and medical history in mind
  • Education about exercise and how you can start a regular exercise routine
  • Prescription medications when needed
  • Enthusiastic tips and recommendations if you hit a weight loss plateau or don't achieve your goals
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Choosing a medically supervised weight loss treatment plan from Back 2 Health Physical Medicine ensures that you lose weight safely and effectively, even after you achieve your weight loss goals. As you shed excess weight, we can also provide training and recommendations that keep the pounds off for good. If you're ready to give up on crash dieting and unsafe fads, it's time to call Back 2 Health in West Ashley, SC. Your body, your friends, and your family will thank you!

A Safe Solution to Long-TermWeight Loss

If you were to ask someone on the street to name a popular fad diet, they probably wouldn't have much trouble. From Atkins to South Beach and Keto to Paleo, we've all heard of at least one popular weight-loss trend. The problem with these diets is that they only work for some people. Even then, the results are often short-lived.

If you're wondering whether you have been on or are currently using a fad diet, ask yourself these questions:

  • Is there a "magic" food source that will melt the pounds off your body?
  • Is the speed of weight loss unnatural or unrealistic?
  • Can you achieve "weight loss" without proper diet and exercise?
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If you answered "yes" to any of the above questions, chances are it's a fad diet, and it most likely won't be very effective over the long run. With fad diets, balanced nutrition often takes the back seat to sketchy weight loss pills or extreme life choices - all of which are counterproductive to a healthy life.

If you have struggled with your weight for any length of time, there's no doubt you're stressed out trying to find an effective solution. You probably have many stories about following fad diets, taking unhealthy diet pills, or even dropping big bucks on expensive exercise equipment. If you're like most of our clients, you're still struggling with your weight, despite your best efforts. The common theme here is that all of your self-made attempts happened without the medical guidance of a true medical weight loss clinic in West Ashley, SC.

If this sounds like you, we've got great news. The safest, most effective solution to losing weight starts with the help of Back 2 Health's medical weight loss plans. Instead of choosing a fad diet, speak to one of our weight loss healthcare professionals. We can help you lose weight in a way that you find enjoyable, so you actually like

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Factors That Contribute to Obesity

Obesity is a nuanced disease that involves excessive amounts of body fat. It's not just a cosmetic concern. It's a medical issue that raises a person's chance of severe diseases and health problems. Often, obese people have problems losing weight because of physiological, genetic, and environmental factors. There are many other contributing factors to weight gain, including:

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Inactivity

People who live sedentary lifestyles will take in more calories than they burn off through exercise or day-to-day activities. Inactivity is a huge problem in today's society, especially with the constant presence of computers, smartphones, and tablets that encourage the user to stay glued to their screen.

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Unhealthy Diet

If your daily food intake consists of high-caloric fast-food meals full of oversized portions, expect to gain weight quickly.

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Liquid Calories

Alcoholic and other high-calorie drinks like sodas cause people to intake large amounts of calories without ever feeling full. When combined with a poor diet and lack of water intake, consuming liquid calories can be a significant contributor to weight gain.

Medical Weight Loss West Ashley, SC
Pregnancy

Weight gain is very common during pregnancy, but some women find it hard to lose the added pounds once they have given birth. With time, this weight gain will contribute to obesity.

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Lack of Sleep

When you don't get enough sleep, your whole body suffers. If you're only getting a few hours of sleep a night, you may notice increased appetite and even hormone changes. Both factors can contribute to obesity.

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Smoking Cessation

Quitting smoking is one of the healthiest choices you can make as an adult. However, sometimes smoking cessation causes weight gain. For some, this weight gain gets out of control and leads to obesity. Often times this happens as former smokers use food to cope with their withdrawals.

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Stress

When you're stressed out, you may turn to a chocolate bar or cheeseburger as "comfort food" to deal with whatever problem you're facing. Turning to fast food and sweets is not a healthy way to deal with stress and can lead to obesity.

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS SPECIAL LIMITED TIME OFFER WHICH INCLUDES:

  • Medical Consultation
  • Nutritional Conselling
  • Medical weight loss program
  • Weekly lipo B-12 injections
  • Blood work

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$99

Consequences of Obesity

Although being obese is considered a physical condition, obesity's effects stretch far beyond a person's body composition and weight. Being overweight is associated with several long-term health problems. Many of these problems rank among the nation's leading reasons for premature death. Generally, the more excess weight you carry around, the more likely you are to develop negative complications with your health.

Individuals who are clinically obese have a heightened risk of the following ailments:

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  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol)
  • Cardiovascular Issues (stroke, heart attack, and more)
  • Acid Reflux and Heartburn
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Joint Pain, Back Pain, and Orthopedic Issues
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Blood Clots
  • Fatty Liver Disease
  • Skin Infections
  • Incontinence from Stress
  • Breathing Problems
  • Cancer (colon, uterus, esophagus, cervix, pancreas, prostate, and more)
  • Severe Symptoms Resulting from COVID-19

The good news? Substantial weight loss is possible with diet, physical activity, and the help of a medical weight loss team. You do not have to be destined to live with obesity and a shorter life expectancy. Back 2 Health Physical Medicine is here to steer you down the path to a positive, healthy life for years to come.

Benefits of Using a Medical Weight Loss Clinic in West Ashley, SC

Controlling your weight is a healthy habit that allows you to maintain proper health. However, losing weight isn't just about looking better. It's about feeling better too and is a very important part of being healthy and well. Before you throw caution out the window and try a "miraculous" weight loss solution, contact Back 2 Health Physical Medicine. Our medical weight loss clinicians don't just focus on making you slimmer. Instead, we oversee improvements relating to hormonal imbalances, high blood pressure, cholesterol, digestive problems, and diet. We are devoted to changing the lives of our clients, one weight loss plan at a time.

Here are just a few benefits of using a medical weight loss clinic:

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Inactivity
Inactivity

People who live sedentary lifestyles will take in more calories than they burn off through exercise or day-to-day activities. Inactivity is a huge problem in today's society, especially with the constant presence of computers, smartphones, and tablets that encourage the user to stay glued to their screen.

Unhealthy Diet
Unhealthy Diet

If your daily food intake consists of high-caloric fast-food meals full of oversized portions, expect to gain weight quickly.

Liquid Calories
Liquid Calories

Alcoholic and other high-calorie drinks like sodas cause people to intake large amounts of calories without ever feeling full. When combined with a poor diet and lack of water intake, consuming liquid calories can be a significant contributor to weight gain.

It's Time to Make a Change

When you sign up with Back 2 Health, know that you are taking a hugely important step to living a healthier life. If you're ready to feel better, look better, and live longer, call our medical weight loss clinic in West Ashley today. Before you know it, you will look and feel better than you ever have before.

FREE CONSULTATION

Latest News in West Ashley, SC

Plan approved to replace West Ashley middle school to reduce capacity

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston County School Board of Trustees has okayed a plan from staff to replace the current C.E. Williams North campus with a new school.At a Committee of the Whole meeting on Tuesday, the board voted to continue the current middle school configuration in West Ashley dividing sixth-grade students from seventh and eighth-grade students who currently go to C.E. Williams South, near West Ashley High School.The plan that would replace the sixth-grade campus would also allow Pattison’s Academy ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston County School Board of Trustees has okayed a plan from staff to replace the current C.E. Williams North campus with a new school.

At a Committee of the Whole meeting on Tuesday, the board voted to continue the current middle school configuration in West Ashley dividing sixth-grade students from seventh and eighth-grade students who currently go to C.E. Williams South, near West Ashley High School.

The plan that would replace the sixth-grade campus would also allow Pattison’s Academy for Comprehensive Education (PACE) to fund the design and construction of its facilities on the North campus. PACE is a specialty charter school run by a non-profit for students with multiple disabilities. They’re currently operating out of the former St. Andrews Middle School location.

The board committee also approved the expansion of the seventh/eighth grade C.E. Williams South campus by adding eight classrooms.

Despite the new building for sixth-grade students, the district’s plan does not expand capacity. The current building is underutilized with an enrollment of 363 this year. The building capacity is 904 according to data presented at the meeting.

The new building will be built to hold 600 students, with an expansion capacity of 900. This stands in stark contrast to the South campus which is nearing capacity. That building holds 969 students and currently has 835 students.

However, the district contends West Ashley is not growing as fast as it appears. If current projections remain unchanged the North campus is not expected to exceed 431 students in the next six years. The South campus is expected to peak at 848 students over the same time period.

Former West Ashley High School principal Lee Runyon says the district says the district’s plan is not properly taking into account growth in West Ashley.

“I think that the current plan is again short-sighted and smacks of continued use of taxpayer dollars to try and put a Band-Aid on the problem of systemic growth,” Runyon said. “Anytime you’re running an organization, you’re either growing or you’re dying. If the district is projecting flatline growth in a community that is exploding with residential growth, I think that’s poor leadership.”

Parents like Ragan DuBose-Morris say there are plenty of kids in West Ashley, but many parents are opting to send their middle schoolers out of District 10 to seek out more traditional options.

“West Ashley is the only area in Charleston County that does not have a traditional K-12 pipeline so that you can attend at a traditional elementary, middle and high school configuration,” DuBose-Morris said. “That has been a problem.”

The district’s own numbers suggest only 65 percent of students living in West Ashley attend the two campuses. Despite living in West Ashley, DuBose-Morris chooses to take her children to schools in North Charleston. She says whenever a child has to move to a new school there’s a transitional period that disrupts education. She says she wants to eliminate as many of those transitions as possible.

“They [children] have the knowledge of being in an environment for six through 12th grade,” DuBose-Morris said. “So we have stability, they’re not transitioning between schools. The guidance counselors know who they are. Their teachers know who they are. They’re able to progress through a process in which they have support.”

The current configuration was initiated in part to produce more diverse schools. Constituent board chair for District 10 (West Ashley) Rodney Lewis says the schools are now more diverse and the sixth-grade academy model can work. He says the smaller classes away from the influence of older students are helpful for students to enter adolescents.

“Any time there’s a new program it never just jumps off the first two or three years,” Lewis said. “You got to work it. It’s like a business. You start a business you won’t go to the top automatically. You have to grow there. Allow this to grow and you will see how it works.”

The project is part of the Phase Five Capital Buildings Program that is being funded by a one percent sales tax approved by voters in 2020. The project is budgeted for $40 million and is expected to be completed in 2026.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

West Ashley brewery adds 2nd taproom; hard kombucha brewery opening downtown

Two new taprooms are coming to Charleston in the next month.One is a newcomer specializing in lagers and hard kombucha, while the other is a household name known for signature beers like the Sungazer hazy IPA.Craft beer drinkers will find that beer and other refreshing sippers at Avondale brewery Charles Towne Fermentory, which will add a second taproom outfitted with a spacious beer garden, site owner Adam Goodwin told The Post and Courier.Thos...

Two new taprooms are coming to Charleston in the next month.

One is a newcomer specializing in lagers and hard kombucha, while the other is a household name known for signature beers like the Sungazer hazy IPA.

Craft beer drinkers will find that beer and other refreshing sippers at Avondale brewery Charles Towne Fermentory, which will add a second taproom outfitted with a spacious beer garden, site owner Adam Goodwin told The Post and Courier.

Those who attended Charleston Beer Week might recognize the new taproom called The Garden by Charles Towne Fermentory. The 1331 Ashley River Road compound, that was previously occupied by Wine and Design, hosted Beer Week’s grand finale in November 2021.

“When I found this property it was kind of just perfect,” Goodwin said. “We ended up fully gutting the building. We added (a nearly) 1,000-square-foot covered deck out back and then did all the landscaping outside to make it a little more of an accommodating place to hang and enjoy beer.”

Goodwin has the capability to brew small test batches at the new location, but the majority of The Garden’s 8-14 beers will come from Charles Towne Fermentory’s 5,000-square-foot Avondale brewery at 809 Savannah Highway.

Because of South Carolina’s three-tier system, Goodwin must purchase his own beer from a distributor in order to sell at The Garden, which will also offer wine and cider for non-beer drinkers.

The Garden will host a grand opening party May 28, with Co-Hog and Foxes Fried popping up with food at the event. Moving forward, The Garden will be open from 2-10 p.m. Monday-Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday.

As Charles Towne Fermentory expands, downtown Charleston’s brewery district is adding another brewery to a list that already includes destinations like Revelry Brewing Co., Munkle Brewing Co. and Edmund’s Oast Brewing Co.

Specializing in lagers and hard kombucha, Bevi Bene Brewing Co. is located in The Lumberyard development at 1859 Summerville Ave. in downtown Charleston. Guests can expect to find eight beers and a handful of hard kombuchas when the new brewery opens June 18.

Husband-and-wife entrepreneurs Marissa and Clay Carlisle are behind Bevi Bene, which means “drink well” in Italian. The 5,000-square-foot space features an outdoor patio and mural by Savannah artist JULU that is visible heading northbound on Interstate 26.

“We’re a lager focused brewery,” Marissa Carlisle said. “We will have sours and then we’ll be introducing hard kombucha to the Charleston community.”

Specifically, Bevi Bene will serve traditional lagers, kettle sours and hard kombucha. “Mostly sessionable stuff which means lower alcohol just because we want people to come stay awhile,” according to Clay Carlisle.

To make the hard kombucha, he brews regular kombucha that’s put in a closed fermenter with more sugar and brewer’s yeast. The yeast eats the sugar, converting it into ethanol (alcohol produced by fermentation). Bevi Bene is believed to be the first Charleston area brewery to offer hard kombucha.

The brewery will host a grand opening on June 25, with food trucks Chucktown Meatball Co. and Vibrant Alkaline Vegan Meals serving at the event.

Once open, Bevi Bene will serve customers from 1-8 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, noon-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday and noon-9 p.m. Sunday.

Dead vultures in Charleston Co. test positive for avian flu, health officials say

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - State health officials are warning community members to avoid dead or sick wild vultures after dead vultures found in Charleston County tested positive for avian influenza.The Department of Health and Environmental Control says they are aware of a “mass die-off” of wild vultures in the county. Some of those birds tested positive for the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) caused by the influenza virus subtypes, including H5N1.West Ashley homeowner Dore Carlo said he found a few dead vu...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - State health officials are warning community members to avoid dead or sick wild vultures after dead vultures found in Charleston County tested positive for avian influenza.

The Department of Health and Environmental Control says they are aware of a “mass die-off” of wild vultures in the county. Some of those birds tested positive for the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) caused by the influenza virus subtypes, including H5N1.

West Ashley homeowner Dore Carlo said he found a few dead vultures behind his home on May 6. The following day, he went to another pond further behind his home and found dozens of carcasses.

“They hang out here. They breed out here,” Carlo said. “At any given time, there would be hundreds of them here. As you can see, there’s very few.”

Photos shared with Live 5 News from May 7 captured the dead vultures lying along the banks of the pond.

The homeowner said the pond where the birds were discovered is frequented by neighbors who walk their pets and children who fish.

Carlo said he received an email from his property manager and a phone call from DHEC on Tuesday confirming the birds had tested positive for avian flu.

He said the deaths have left neighbors worried.

“Everybody once they found out it was bird flu were very concerned,” Carlo said. “Again, we’re concerned that there’s other animals coming out here feasting on these dead vultures, and hopefully, it’s not spreading to anything else.”

The agency said while the risk to people, pets and tame animals is thought to be low, the risk is not well known and contact with dead or sick birds should be avoided.

Additionally, the agency recommends avoiding areas where the birds have been found as the virus can be spread through feathers and fecal matter or areas contaminated by infected birds.

The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources encourages the public to report unusual bird deaths, which Carlo said was his goal.

“I’m just trying to get the word out to everybody to keep away from this area,” Carlo said. “Everybody’s concerned about getting rid of the dead vultures now, and most of all, just keep kids and pets away from the area.”

DHEC said anyone who comes in contact with a dead bird and develops symptoms of fevers, coughs, fatigue and body aches to seek medical attention and report the potential exposure to their health care provider and local health department.

DHEC recommends monitoring for symptoms for 10 days after known exposure to a bird with HPAI.

The homeowner’s association said they are working with DHEC on a way to handle and remove the dead vultures from area.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

'I couldn't stop telling him how amazing he is, how grateful I am': West Columbia woman reunited with sentimental ring

"It's one of the little things I have left of my son and I truly thought I was never going to get it back. I thought it was gone," Ashley Henry said.WEST COLUMBIA, S.C. — We've all suffered from that feeling of panic in realizing a piece of jewelry you love is missing. Sadly, most times that ring or necklace never comes back.But that was not the case for Ashley Henry.She and her family were spending the day at Lake Murray, a ...

"It's one of the little things I have left of my son and I truly thought I was never going to get it back. I thought it was gone," Ashley Henry said.

WEST COLUMBIA, S.C. — We've all suffered from that feeling of panic in realizing a piece of jewelry you love is missing. Sadly, most times that ring or necklace never comes back.

But that was not the case for Ashley Henry.

She and her family were spending the day at Lake Murray, a place meant for fun family and adventure, when it turned into a location of loss shortly after.

Henry took off her locket at a picnic table before getting into the water. It's a very sentimental piece of jewelry that reminds her of the son she lost nine months ago.

The ring attached to the locket even has his hair inside it, so it can't be replaced.

"My husband grabbed it and put it in my bag, so I paid no attention, I assumed I had clasped it even though I hadn't and so I knew exactly where it would've come off at," Henry said.

But Ashley didn't notice the ring was gone from the locket chain until days later. She checked that picnic table on Lake Murray but couldn't find it, so she posted to Facebook for help. The answer came only a few days later.

"I just like to do some good where I can, make people happy," said Zachary Allen, man who found the ring.

A North Carolina resident saw her post through a mutual friend and drove 3.5 hours to help.

"I know that I'm dealing with my own thing battling cancer and I can only imagine what she had to go through having a son with special needs and losing him," Allen said.

Henry was overwhelmed with emotion and gratitude.

"It just meant so much to me that he did that, just trying to, I mean who does that, who goes that far out of their way? I just felt so grateful," Henry said. "I felt so many emotions ... It was so hard to even put into words how I felt because of how extremely special this ring is to me to begin with."

Henry said she and her family would camp out at that picnic table often when they go to the lake.

"I think Aiden was protecting my ring, keeping it safe until this guy got here," Henry said.

As a thank you, Henry tells News 19 she wants to donate to St. Jude's Hospital for cancer research on Zachary's behalf.

She's also created a Go Fund Me for Zachary's medical expenses that you can find here.

Editorial: Find better traffic solutions for West Ashley than I-526 extension

Skeptics of extending Interstate 526 from U.S. Highway 17 to Johns and James islands have called the project “a code, not a road,” a pithy rhyme that describes the project’s impracticality while recognizing the serious traffic problems — and the very real frustrations over those problems — that supporters have hoped the new road would magically solve.But with its price tag rising from $725 million several years ago to $2.35 billion today, and with Charleston County required to pay all but $380 million of ...

Skeptics of extending Interstate 526 from U.S. Highway 17 to Johns and James islands have called the project “a code, not a road,” a pithy rhyme that describes the project’s impracticality while recognizing the serious traffic problems — and the very real frustrations over those problems — that supporters have hoped the new road would magically solve.

But with its price tag rising from $725 million several years ago to $2.35 billion today, and with Charleston County required to pay all but $380 million of that — the state capped its commitment at $420 million and already has spent more than $45 million toward that cap — the project’s status has gone from impractical to practically ridiculous. Or, as Councilman Henry Darby said Thursday, “I don’t know whether to laugh or cry.”

Instead of getting kicked by the mule yet again, it’s time for Charleston County and state transportation officials to back away from the special status of this project, also known as the Mark Clark extension (even though it would be a 45 mph parkway, not an interstate), and instead redouble their efforts on other traffic solutions that can be completed more quickly, less expensively and with more widespread public favor.

This road is going nowhere fast, but that reality must not make officials too complacent to tackle the serious congestion problems that made extension advocates think it was a good idea in the first place. Even if a magical solution were to appear, the extension still would take more than a dozen years to build. S.C. Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall has recommended proceeding with about $150 million in engineering work to get the project ready for bid, but we urge her and Charleston County not to spend another cent.

Instead, they should use that money to launch a special planning effort to identify better options for easing congestion in West Ashley as well as on Johns and James islands. That would move us toward a solution faster than somehow hoping there will be a way forward for the Mark Clark extension when the state Transportation Department returns to the county in a few months with an even more refined cost estimate. Some council members suggest opponents have delayed 526 and driven up its costs. Even if that were true, and we would argue it’s not, they should think about this: Now that it costs more than $1 billion more, are those opponents going to give up now?

There are other solutions that aren’t as dramatic but also wouldn’t be nearly as costly or controversial, such as building the “pitchfork” roads on both sides of Maybank Highway from River Road to the Stono River bridge. The ongoing work to address Main Road, from Bees Ferry to Betsy Kerrison, also will help, and there are other projects in West Ashley that could help, too. We also believe our tax dollars would be better spent beginning a study on a bus rapid transit line through West Ashley similar to the one being developed along Rivers Avenue. In other words, we should seek many solutions, not a single, prohibitively expensive one.

Extending Interstate 526 across Johns and James islands in particular was never a good idea because of the environmental damage involved and the dubious impact it would have on traffic congestion, particularly when measured by the bang for the buck. More cost-effective solutions can address traffic without marring the edges of these two sea islands.

Look at it another way: From a traffic engineering standpoint, it might be easier to get around the Charleston region if Interstate 526 were extended from where it ends at U.S. Highway 17 in Mount Pleasant through the Old Village and across the Cooper River to where the James Island connector touches down on the peninsula. It would be like building our own ring road, like Interstate 285 around Atlanta.

Of course, nobody has suggested that — for a multitude of reasons that go far beyond cost.

For years, development on Johns Island has been allowed to spread rapidly while road improvements lagged far behind, a scenario that has played out in other parts of the Charleston metro area. Anyone who lives on Johns Island or travels there knows it’s a frustrating problem that also impacts West Ashley and James Island. But that’s another reason why state and local officials should step back from their grand 526 extension plan and refocus their thinking on more cost-effective, practical traffic solutions.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

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